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127 Discovery Trail

Port Union, Newfoundland and Labrador

A0C 2J0  

 

1-709-469-2257

© 2017 by Seaport Inn. Proudly created with Wix.com

Historic Sites

PORT UNION

Historic Port Union is the oldest union built town in North America. 

Construction began on the shores of Trinity Bay, Newfoundland, in 1916. Within five years, a busy and modern union town bordered the protected deep-water harbour-all made possible through the hard work and vision of the members of the Fishermen’s Protective Union (the FPU) and their first leader, William Ford Coaker.

 

To learn more about the Union Town, visit the Factory and The Bungalow.

ELLISTON

The great sealing disasters of 1914 contributed greatly to the loss of a generation soon to be devastated by World War I. In remembering these men, Home from The Sea presents the historical and cultural context of sealing in Newfoundland and Labrador through seven captivating visitor experiences.

Learn more by visiting their website: https://www.homefromthesea.ca/

BONAVISTA

Cape Bonavista Lighthouse

The building was constructed in 1843 and is currently restored to the 1870s period. The highlight of the lighthouse is an original catoptric light mechanism that dates to 1816. An adjacent interpretation centre features exhibits on lighthouse technology and lightkeepers’ lives.

Matthew Legacy Building

500 years after John Cabot first arrived in Newfoundland, both Bristol and Newfoundland marked the monumental event by recreating the voyage in 1997. A replica of Cabot’s ship, The Matthew, sailed across the Atlantic and landed at Bonavista’s shores and was greeted by hundreds of on-lookers, including Queen Elizabeth II.  The Matthew Legacy Centre was built to house the ship and visitors can tour the boat and learn more about Cabot.

Check out the video below to learn more on how the voyage was made:

The Ryan Premises

A salty scent lingers within the cluster of white, 19th century clapboard buildings of the Ryan Premises, perched on the shore of Bonavista’s historic and picturesque harbour. Hear the reminiscences of the site’s interpreters, most of whom have a personal connection to the fishing industry; marvel at the variety of artifacts in the on-site Bonavista Museum; and explore the internationally-recognized “Cod, Seals and Survivors” exhibition that tells the 500-year story of Canada’s east coast fishery.